Skip to main content

U.S. News Review: Issue 5




Hairstyles for war jobs. Making rifles by assembly line. Absenteeism. Our children--a war problem regarding daycare while mothers work. Army fight song: "Off we go/Into the wild blue yonder"


Audio/Visual sound, b&w

Reviews

Reviewer: Guillermo A. Martinez (de Argentina) - - May 16, 2008
Subject: La guarderia de la Warner Bros y Philip Ragan
Aparte del aspecto del águila en los títulos de inicio que parece amenazante, comienzo en partes:

1: Nadie habra notado o si que el segmento animado es parecido a otro cortometraje del archivo titulado "Which Way This Time?" en los créditos finales aparece el nombre de Philip Ragan, donde los gráficos parecen similares a los del Atari 2600.

2: El siguiente segmento a los 3:08 comienza con la música de la Warner Bros! (chequeen las presentaciones en Youtube), uuh, en que pensaron cuando pusieron la música de stock, mientras que en el 4:35 es unas de las mejores recreaciones de hiperactividad que he visto (contando la versión de los 50s del "Gran hermano", Big Brother en ingles)

3: El ultimo segmento falto el "Bouncy Ball" (sic) y ya estaba completo.

No estoy acostumbrado a escribir los mensajes en el Archive, pero cuando descubro algo... lo escribo al instante.
Reviewer: ERD - - January 27, 2006
Subject: A must see for anyone interested in 20th century American history.
A late 1942 film news reveiw showing the sacrifices and problems facing the American civlians and soldiers of World WAR II. The actual air battle is impressive, and the visual introduction to the Air Force song is inspiring.
"U.S. News Review" is a most see for anyone interested in 20th century American history. One thing that bothered me, however, was the obvious segregation seen of our citizens.
Reviewer: Spuzz - - August 14, 2005
Subject: Off into the wild blue Yonder..
Pretty amazing newsree here..

First off we have Veronica Lake! And her hair!! Women want to imitate her hairstyle.. but wait! Because this is wartime, a lot of women who imititate her hairstyle are in danger of having their hair caught in machines if they are working! Ms. Turner then displays her tied up hair in the hopes that women would copy her, see? she was doing her part in the war! The narrator states that women are "going one step further" by wearing hair caps!

The 2nd part deals with absenteeism. Shown in animation, if it takes 3 men to build a gun, and the 2nd man is missing, what happens? A lot of barrels and holders I imagine. Curiously interesing piece here,

The 3rd part is the most astonishing part in this, as we see the problems that children face when Dad is off to war, and mom is working in the factory. Some people leave them in all day matinees (!!), on the street, in the car while they're at work (!!!) and some are just left at home period to look after themselves. This was one scary segment, and really drives the point down that women were needed during the war, but at what cost? Funny how the solution was community centers, and how they were looking for women to man them too. What happened to THEIR children?

The Fourth bit deals with an air raid, this is pretty typical of the war footage of the period. Watch for the very nervous Commander telling of the instructions for the raid.

The fifth bit, doggone it, is the Air Force Anthem sung to a collage of airplane assembly! Don't know the words? Don't worry, the words will appear for you to sing along to (I did).

Somewhat boringly narrated but terrifically making up for it with the images, this was quite a surprise, especially with the first three segments, worth a look. Reccomended!
Reviewer: Wilford B. Wolf - - July 28, 2005
Subject: 100
Pseudo-newsreel produced circa late 1942 by the US War Information Office, aimed specifically at the domestic (and largely female) war worker audience.

The film is divided into five pieces. The first section shows movie icon Veronica Lake changing from her famous "witchlock" hairstyle of the late 1930s to the upswept hairstyle of the early 1940s. Interestingly, this seems to be part of a conscious part of government fashion engineering, with the assistance by the Hollywood studios, to keep hair out of the eyes of war workers. The narrator emphasizes the use of caps and bandana to keep hair out of the eyes to improve efficency and simple clothing.

The second section is probably the best. This section covers how absenteeism can slow down production and deprive soliders of equipment. To make this point, it uses wonderfully abstract animation, reminscient of what would be used by ZTT to promote their albums in the 1980s. I can pieces of this animation being looped and recut to a wonderful effect for a music video.

The third section is equally interesting, as we can see the origins of the postwar social engineering films. The section covers the strains that female workers are under by being pressed into war service. The section tries to have it both ways; it suggests that it is best for women to stay at home to take care of the children, yet they are needed for the war effort. The theme that would continue into the 1950s is that children left to their own devices are prone to deliquency. The solution proposed has surprisingly fascist overtones, as it calls for the expansion of afterschool activities and day care facilities so that the children "learn useful skills." There seems to be a suggestion that it is necessary to train the children to eventually become soliders, an actually common feeling early in the war, as there wasn't an idea how long the war in Europe and Asia would actually last. It was this fear that drove Orwell to write 1984; a world mired in perpetual war.

The fourth section details the efforts by the British Royal Air Corps in a night time bombing run over Bremman, Germany in June 1942. Lots of footage of bombers taking off and getting prepared. Here, the narrator emphasizes that the number of planes, over 1000, help protect the fleet. The narrator is proud to point out that the BAF only had a 5% casuality rate. Interestingly, but not surprisingly, this is the only actual war footage in the piece, and there is none from American forces.

The piece ends with the Amry Air Corps' theme song "Into The Wild Blue Yonder" sung over footage of the assembly and flying of bombers (B-17? B-29?).

An interesting sociohistorical artifact from the war years.
In Collection
Prelinger Archives
Uploaded
on 9/16/2004
Views
6,014
Favorites
13
Reviews
4
PEOPLE ALSO FOUND
Prelinger Archives
2,780
0
4
( 4 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
1,359
0
2
( 2 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
3,507
0
2
( 2 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
2,373
0
3
( 3 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
9,606
0
5
( 5 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
6,997
0
3
( 3 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
1,263
0
2
( 2 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
6,594
0
2
( 2 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
2,838
0
4
( 4 reviews )
Prelinger Archives
5,965
0
2
( 2 reviews )